Post your JFK Inaugural Address Analysis essay so that your classmates may view and critique it. Please use your pseudonym so that you can remain anonymous. I should know your pseudonym, if you have not shared it with me please email me to do so.


Posted by Jenna Rink
Inauguration is a formal ceremony indicating the start of a leader's term in office. In the United States of America, elected presidents traditionally give an inaugural address.[Superfluous.] not really, it's a transition into the next sentence. if it were not there, the sentences would not make sense next to eachother. President John F. Kennedy's inaugural speech was arguably one of the most memorable and quoted addresses. Through his use of antithesis, anaphora, and parallelism in his inaugural address, JFK instills confidence in the American people of his abilities as their new leader. With his speech, Kennedy establishes credibility as an orator, and his superb use of rhetoric presents him as confident and trustworthy: if Kennedy believes in what he is speaking about, the American people undoubtedly will too.
Near the beginning of his dialogue, Kennedy mentions adamantly that America will "pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, [and] oppose any foe," (p5) for the preservation of liberty. This classic example of parallelism of clauses makes clear Kennedy's intent to do anything it takes for the survival of peace and liberty. Expound, please
Using parallelism again, Kennedy states that both sides of a conflict should join in creating "a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved," (p20). Here, his use of parallel structure relays that Kennedy aims to help all people, while securing peace and freedom as well.
Perhaps Kennedy's strongest use of parallelism - coupled with anaphora - is in paragraphs 16 through 19 - where he states, "Let both sides explore what problems unite us… Let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms… Let both sides seek to invoke the wonders of science…Let both sides unite to… let the oppressed go free." This combination of anaphora and parallelism relies both on pathos and logos, repeating with grammatical structure the idea of unity between nations.
Kennedy certainly was one for helping other nations, and using anaphora, pledged to help those who are less fortunate - "not because the communists may be doing it, not because we seek their votes, but because it is right," (p9). This use of rhetoric signifies that Kennedy will do what is right, not what is popular. Ironically, this idea made Kennedy popular.
Now employing antithesis, Kennedy goes on to say that America should "never negotiate out of fear… [but] never fear to negotiate," (p15). This statement outlines one of his main goals as president - the spread of peace. And perhaps the most famous line from Kennedy's speech, "ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country," (p26) is undoubtedly antithesis. Recheck the definition for antithesis "a counter-proposition and denotes a direct contrast to the original proposition,"...yup sounds right to me! His use of this rhetorical strategy in this case calls the American people to action by incorporating them into the speech, and also creates an infamously [Infamous has negative connotations; another word would be better] inspiring idea that is still quoted today. By using antithesis, Kennedy makes the listener think and tells them exactly what to think about - the idea of peace and freedom, for the greater good of everybody.
Kennedy's careful diction, effective rhetoric, and confident, committed tone throughout the speech reassure the American public of the abilities of their newly elected president. His use of repetition proves that he is serious about achieving peace and unity, emphasizing and reinforcing his objectives. By juxtaposing several ideas, he convinces America to believe in his position. Kennedy's goal with his inaugural address was to voice his intentions as president, and to get the American people on his side. Through this speech and his outstanding use of rhetoric, Kennedy undoubtedly achieved this goal. The late, great Kennedy gained respect from many people with this speech, and will certainly be remembered by all.
Edited by Isebella Zook

Posted by mileyyyyyy
>Kennedy’s inaugural speech was one of history’s most memorable. His words describing his vision and his goal were applied not only to him as a president but also to the American people. The connection he makes with his audience throughout the speech ​is intentionally personal so that his audience can easily relate to him. In his speech he uses his credentials as a pathway for the people to see past the fact that he is a young Roman Catholic. In his attempt to bond with the subject and the audience he uses parallelism, anaphora, and parenthesis.
>John F. Kennedy uses parallelism to put his ideas of what the country needs to start doing together. change order - to put together his ideas of what the country needs to start doing He states that “We shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, or oppose any foe.” His use of parallelism here combines all the actions he is calling for. The use of the word “we” in this quote is effective because it gives a sense of unity and gives the connection between him and the American people.
>The use of parallelism in his speech also opens up a chance for him to describe his visions effectively. “Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths and encourage the arts and commerce.” In this sentence he sums up what he sees in the future generations using strong diction. i dunno what you learned, but i was taught that you should incorporate a quote into the sentence rather than just writing the quote on it's own and then analyzing.
>Kennedy’s use of anaphora increases his emphasis on the message he is trying to get across. He uses the repetition of phrases to appeal to pathos and to climax into his goal of keeping the audience’s attention. In paragraphs 15-18 he repeats the words “both sides” to merge and reinforce his ideas. He centralizes his points around the subject of human rights and the American people’s obligations.
>Finally, the use of parentheses became his device to keep the reader’s attention. He uses parentheses to distract the audience with something interesting but also with something that relates to his main subject. Its appeal to pathos is clearly shown when he states “not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need… rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation.” Words like embattled, burden, and struggle
out to the audience.
>Kennedy’s inaugural speech is one to be remembered throughout history. The use of parallelism to merge his ideas and his visions, anaphora to increase emphasis and reinforce his ideas, and parentheses keep the audience’s attention, all contributed into achieving his purpose and turning this speech into something that is used as a standard for later presidents to come.

pretty good essay, you brought up some points that i had overlooked when reading it myself. mostly just make sure that when you refer to his speech, you are doing so in present tense. maybe work on your transitions a little more to make the paragraphs fit together better. you might do this by using quotes that contain more than one literary device?
Hey thanks!

Posted by SeptemberCannR

When John F. Kennedy gave his inaugural speech back (this is extra and doesn't sound quite right) in 1961, the United States was going through major changes, not just the change of a new president but also a major shift in the way America interacted with the world. Kennedy used his inaugural speech as a call to action to bring Americans together as one nation in order to help other nations. President Kennedy obviously knew exactly what to say and how to say it in order to achieve his goal of unity. He used strong and powerful diction, lasting and accurate metaphors, and meaningful syntax to convey his powerful message to Americans.
In his speech John F. Kennedy has a very declarative and serious tone. Kennedy starts his speech by addressing the oath and its honored place by using archaic phrases such as “the same solemn oath our forefathers prescribed nearly a century and three quarters ago”(Line 5). He uses that to show America that he is serious and committed to the oath of the presidency. Kennedy then moves onto the future and uses words such as “renewal” and “change” to lead into his point about the next generation of Americans. Kennedy refers to the American people of the time as “heirs” of the first revolution as if they are royalty and it is their duty to continue that reign of their forefathers. He also states “that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans” (Line 12), which appeals to the younger adults and young generations to in a sense take that “torch” and run with it.
Kennedy also uses strong and striking words to empower his speech and to appeal to the minds and emotions of Americans. He uses words like “poverty”, “freedom”, “human rights”, and “tyranny”. All of the major words he used were major concerns for the American people and still are major concerns today. Kennedy knew that his logic and formal speech would make people think, but he also knew that those words would make people care.
Throughout this speech President Kennedy uses strong metaphors to show how the United States has changed from the way it once was, and how it will continue to change. He starts off by simply stating “the world is very different now” (Line 7) and then he begins to explain how. One of his most famous metaphors is “those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside” (Line 28). By that he meant that other countries that latched onto and followed countries led by tyranny became the victim of that tyrannical country. Kennedy continues to compare the United States to other countries throughout his speech, but none of the other metaphors have quite the same effect as his strong metaphor about his beliefs against tyranny.


Kennedy is probably best known for his use of parallelism in his speeches. The parallelism that he uses seems especially powerful when he makes note of the new scientific discoveries that have changed the world by saying “man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life” (Line 7). He goes onto use many other forms of parallelism in this speech that are powerful, but there is one example that has become infamous. The phrase “ask not what your country can do for you- ask what you can do for your country” (Line 87) has become the rally cry for American loyalty for the past four decades and has become synonymous with President Kennedy and his inaugural address. It is a powerful example of parallelism, so powerful that it inspired a nation of people to come together to fight for what is right.
Most inaugural addresses are quickly forgotten by the American public as soon as they are given, but Kennedy’s was different. His words have stayed with the American public for over four decades. Kennedy knew what to say and how to say it through his own unique declarative diction, accurate metaphors, and lasting parallelism.

​ Overall, your essay had a good structure and was in a logical order. You did analayse diction and syntax, but i think your conclusion could be a little stronger. BenjaminRT
R
Posted by -scribbler
President John F. Kennedy gave his inaugural speech in January 1961. He used many different rhetorical strategies to achieve his purpose for this speech. The inaugurals speeches purpose was to inspire the American people to give back to their country and to let our enemies know that we were not afraid of them.
The diction in this speech was formal, because it was a very formal occasion. The diction included words that strike patriotism and action, such as; liberty, freedom, and pledge. President Kennedy used the diction that he did because he was trying to create unity in the country after a very tight presidential race. He also wanted to inspire the people of the United States to do more for their country.
President Kennedy also used a lot of schemes and tropes to get his point across in his speech. One of his favorite schemes to use was parenthesis. President Kennedy used parenthesis to add tidbits of information to his sentences so that they would make more sense or give important information. Another scheme that President Kennedy used quite a lot was antimetabole to emphasize different things that he wants the people to get out of the speech. One of the most famous quotes from the speech “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country” (87) is an antimetabole.
Some of the tropes that President Kennedy used in his speech were oxymorons and hyperboles. He used these to emphasize and explain different things in his speech. At one point President Kennedy calls for a “Peaceful revolution” (36) to give hope to fellow republics. This is a good example of an oxymoron that President Kennedy used to explain what he wanted from the people, unity to help better our country as well as other countries that share our beliefs and peace while doing it.
President Kennedy was successful in his use of his rhetorical strategy. President Kennedy used a lot of different types of rhetorical schemes and tropes in his speech, all of which were very well implemented. They were used to unite the people and to cause pride in them that made them want to help their country.



Posted by: BenjaminRT

-While John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address of 1961 has a very respectful tone for the occasion, he effectively uses rhetoric to unite his audience and assure them that he will be an excellent president. He uses tone, syntax, diction, and rhetorical schemes to achieve his purpose.
-The tone of Kennedy’s address is formal and respectful because not only is it a tradition that every president taking office should give a speech, but because it was an honor for Kennedy to do so. This address was also given during the Cold War, so Kennedy’s tone emphasizes not only the context, but that he wants to unify a very diverse audience to believe in their new president. A less formal tone may have reach eth “average” American well, but would not have commanded nearly enough respect for such a young president.
-The tone is defined through Kennedy’s use of archaic diction. He uses words such as asunder, foe, forebears, writ, and wrought. These words are considered to have “grand” connotations that help lend to the address’s tone.
-His diction is also an appeal to pathos. He mentions “Almighty God,” and uses words such as peace, liberty, freedom, hope, war, hostile powers, mass misery, and iron tyranny. All of these word cause the audience to not only make connection with this address, and between the different examples dispersed throughout, but to have a sense of patriotism because of how they are used, The “good” words are used to describe America, and democracy, while the “bad” words are used to describe communism.
-The diction of this address can only be enhanced by the syntax. Kennedy uses both short and complex sentences throughout his speech. Most of the sentences being short, yet effective. They help the speech flow, and keep the audience’s attention. Short paragraphs also keep the attention of the audience and help emphasize, one point after another, what Kennedy is saying.
-Kennedy also uses rhetorical schemes throughout his speech like parallelism, antithesis, anaphora, and rhetorical questions. Parallelism is used at the beginning of paragraphs to keep the speech on subject and remind the audience what Kennedy is speaking about. He uses antithesis to point out the differences between the people in the audience, but that despite those differences, they are united or a national tradition. He uses anaphora to help keep the speech’s formal and respectful tone. Finally, rhetorical questions are used to incorporate the audience- as individuals- into his speech. They unify the audience and help them agree with Kennedy and therefore see him in a better light.
-John F. Kennedy’s inaugural address unifies his audience and helps them believe in him as a president –despite his age- through the clever use of rhetorical schemes, syntax, diction, and tone, Kennedy uses rhetoric not only to achieve his purpose, but to give his speech a formal and respectful ton and add to his eloquence.

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Posted by: cali_03
Throughout John F. Kennedy uses in his inaugural address, he uses rhetorical strategies such as diction and syntax to put more emphasize on his speech.
Kennedy begins by stating that there is a celebration of freedom and refers back to the oath our forefathers created which refers to the freedom that we are celebrating. He uses short and almost choppy like paragraphs to keep everyone's attention focused on his speech. The diction in this speech make a big impact such as when Kennedy uses words as freedom, hardship and burden. (pg.1)
Kennedy also uses a lot of metaphors during this speech to help people have an example of what he is talking about. When he says "the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans" he is using a metaphor to show that the older generations passed down they're freedom and heritage to the newer generations. (pg.1) "… this hemisphere intends to remain the master of its own house" is a metaphor showing that the hemisphere that America is own
(<-- typo I think) intends to control themselves and let know one else rule them.
He appeals to pathos when he says "pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty" because it shows all of what America had to go through to get to where there are now.
There is alliteration towards the end of the speech when he says "Let both sides explore what problems unite us …" "Let both sides, for the first time …" "Let both sides seek to invoke the wonders of science instead of its terrors." Repeating "let" emphasizes the point he is trying to make.
There are rhetorical questions to close off the speech to leave America with a sense of wonder of what they can do for there country "And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country". Also, the last rhetorical question brings a sense of togetherness and freedom for America
by saying "My fellow citizens of the world, ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man"
Your essay has good information, you just need to organize it more. Put it in a good order, and group similar rhetorical devices, and you should be good. If you really felt like it, you may also wanna add a few more examples to make sure.
Edited by Mr.-T

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John F. Kennedy Analysis
>Kennedy used a varied of rhetoric styles in order to persuade his audience of his primary purpose: that no matter a person’s home country, they all shared a common heritage and because of that, all people should stand together and attempt to further human rights worldwide.
>Kennedy employs heavily on two aspects the Aristotelian triangle, or the rhetoric triangle: ethos and pathos. He uses ethos quite effectively to re-establish his personal character. It was well known that Kennedy was a God-fearing man, and he reinforces this concept by citing the Lord’s name several times in the Address, as well as alluding to a passage from Isaiah in the Bible. He again exerts ethos by offering the olive branch before the rod (so to speak), and encouraging fellow countrymen to “explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us.”
>He (JFK) is as agile with pathos as he is with ethos. Kennedy urges his audience to be “unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of…human rights to which this nation has always been committed, and to which [we] are committed today at home and around the world.” He uses (and often) the “hot” words to encourage his audience in the right direction, emotionally speaking. Kennedy speaks often of the world wide suffering, as well as the ever present invisible Soviet Union (although never directly mentioned) and the threat of nuclear annihilation.
>Along with the Aristotelian triangle, the very manner of how Kennedy frames his Inaugural Address influences the way it is both interpreted and perceived. He varies his sentence and paragraph lengths periodically, as well their complexity. Kennedy uses the shorter and simpler paragraphs and sentences to emphasize specific concepts and personal principles; he gave it its own personal breathing space, so to speak. Immediately after a simpler paragraph, he would follow it up with a “fleshy” one. Kennedy uses the follow-up paragraphs and sentences to give structure to the concepts and principle; often times, he used the smaller and simpler paragraphs to act as a spring board to launch the “fleshy” paragraphs, and their ideals.
>The basis of the speech (being a “call to action” stump speech) thinly hides its true purpose with it’s skillfully uses of rhetoric and word play. Kennedy appeals to the unintelligent masses with laudable uses of emotionally charged words and phrases, and keeps their attention with short, sweet paragraphs, habitually with a tag along “fleshy” paragraph behind it.

Posted by: Isebella Zook
Side note: I had some issues citing my sources from the speech, without line numbers.

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Posted By: Heaven Leigh
JFK Analysis
>Throughout John F. Kennedy’s famous inaugural address, Kennedy uses many rhetorical devices, along with strong diction and syntax.
[remove ", along with" and elaborate on syntax. All papers use syntax, say how his sets his essay apart. Change so that the sentence reads, "...Kennedy uses many rhetorical devices, strong diction and intricate syntax] [large amounts of expansion needed here.]

>He begins with addressing who he is talking to [Change to "He begins by addressing his audience" and then elaborate on HOW he addresses them] and proceeds with using short paragraphs to keep his audience interested. These short paragraphs let Kennedy make each of his points, but never lose the attention of his audience. Kennedy uses a reference to [change "uses a reference to" to "references"] the Revolutionary War, when America got its freedom from England, to show that his presidency will be a celebration of freedom and change. [Consider finding a way to actually work in the reference itself, instead of simply saying that there is one] He uses words that are abstract [Easier to read if "words that are abstract" was changed to "abstract words". It would make you sound more knowledgeable if you say "abstract diction"] to draw his audience in. These words include: freedom, poverty, devotion, loyalty, and sacrifice. Kennedy knows that these words relate to the common people that make up America and uses them to his advantage. These words set the tone of the speech as serious. [sounds better as "These words give his speech a serious tone"]
>Kennedy also uses many forms of pathos, an appeal to emotions, to keep his audience intrigued. “Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans – born in this country, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage – and unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of those human rights to which the nation has always been committed…” (p.4). [This quote seems like it was simply stuck in here. It feels awkward and out of place. While it does have to do with your point about pathos, it is very long and does not flow well with the rest of the paragraph. Try and integrate it into the paper more and shorten it a lot. Pick the parts of the paper that best support your point, not huge chunks of text that only broadly touch it. Consider that it was such a large quote that the reader may not be able to tell which part was the most important.] He also wants nations to know with parallelism [This whole sentence is awkward because JFK doesn't use parallelism to tell other nations these things; he uses it to structure his sentences. He then uses the unique structure of the sentences and his powerful word choice to tell the other nations what he tells them. It is an abstract concept, but if I noticed it, others will too. Also there are grammatical mistakes: Change to "He also uses parallelism to tell other nations". This doesn't really make much sense either, but at least it is phrased correctly.] that America will “pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, [and] oppose any foe” (p.5) to assure its liberty.
>Throughout the speech, Kennedy uses much
[Here it sounds better if you say, "Uses a lot of”] anaphora. Anaphora is the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or lines. [Would make entire last two sentences sound better if you said, “Uses a lot of anaphora, the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or lines.” Instead of breaking it up into two sentences like you did.] He uses “To those” (p. 7-9) and “Let both sides” (p. 16-19). This repetition brings his audience together to unite Americans.
[Expand greatly on this topic]
>Kennedy also makes use of rhetorical questions. These questions make his audience question what they will do for their country and if they’ll join in on the historic effort. This brings the speech to two of the most famous quotes ever said by a president. “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” (p. 26). This quote is an antimetabole [So what? expand on this and tell the audience why this is important or effective.] , along with “My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.” (p. 27).
>All together, the speech is well spoken and thoughtful. Kennedy never stays on one topic too long and he uses good open-ended sentences to transition from each of his points. His use of rhetorical devices is effective and relate
[verb tense here, should be "relates"] to what America needed in a leader during the 1960’s. [Relates is not the word you’re looking for in that sentence. Consider changing to "is what America needed in a leader"]


[Good overall. You should consider focusing on one or two rhetorical devices and then focus on his diction and syntax, like you stated in your opening sentence. When you try to touch on so many topics you end up doing just that, touching on them. You have many different points to make, but none of them are effectively explored or elaborated upon and thus, your essay is not very effective. In other words, you have so many different things that you are trying to talk about in this essay, that it is difficult to talk about any one particular item well. The biggest thing this essay needs is simply more elaboration and expansion on less, but more focused, topics.]

Hope it helped
~ That_Person


Posted by The_Thracian3991
From the beginning of American history, the inaugural address of the president has always been the fundamental step in the new administration. It is the first time that the new president can tell the American people the plan they have in leading the country and how they will enact that plan. These speeches are always extremely memorable and powerful, and John F. Kennedy's is no different. He was able, through the use of rhetoric, to clearly describe to the country his plan for the nation, one of peace, camaraderie, and cooperation. Kennedy's extensive use of parallelism, antithesis, and sentence structure all contribute to the success of his speech.
Throughout his speech, Kennedy utilizes parallelism in order to better convey his points. In multiple sentences in his speech, Kennedy places his ideas in a parallel structure in order to emphasize what he thinks is most important. In his address, he focuses on the idea that the United States “shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and success of liberty”. By using parallelism, he not only makes this stand out in his speech but also displays the order in which he places their importance. During his time as president, the United States was in the beginning of the Cold War and he knew that his focus had to be on containing communism in order to assure the American people that they were safe. His use of parallelism accentuates this belief and does even more. By using parallel structure, Kennedy also keeps his speech flowing. Instead of having to use long, drawn out sentences to hit on each of his ideas, he uses parallel structure in order to fit them all into one sentence. This flow keeps the reader from becoming bored while still accomplishing the purpose of conveying Kennedy's plans to “explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths, and encourage the arts and commerce.”
Antithesis is another rhetorical element that plays a large role in Kennedy's address. He employs it not only in a way of literal comparison but also metaphorically. He uses antithesis to explain how his inauguration “symbolized an end as well as a beginning” and “signified renewal as well as change.” By using words that normally contrast each other, he highlights this idea
as a main focus of his argument. He wants to change the world from the way it used to be by making everyone more cooperative. Kennedy believes that through his election he has started the new world order and that through this rebirth of the world, he will be able
to change it with the help of the American people he is addressing. This idea is apparent through his use of rhetoric and makes the speech much more effective and interesting because he does not have to come out and say it out right. Kennedy also uses antithesis to further his belief that only people can change the world, not just the countries. He believes that the American people should “ask not what America will do for [them], but what together we can do for the freedom of man” and by following this philosophy, we can make the world a better place. While he is much more straightforward and less metaphorical here, he still retains the attention of his audience by using a powerful word like “freedom”.
Kennedy's sentence structure is another key rhetorical component in the effectiveness of his address. Kennedy used a majority of short sentences yet his sentences still varied greatly in their complexity. Some of this short sentences were quite elaborate while even his short sentences were sometimes quite simple. This variety in arrangement allows Kennedy to fit all of his ideas into a simple configuration while still remaining very formal. Kennedy also uses structural repetition to generate quite a different effect. In paragraphs six through ten, he begins the first sentence of each paragraph with a direct reference “to” someone. By using anaphora, Kennedy helps connect all of these paragraphs and draws focus to them so that whomever each paragraph addresses is paying greater attention. His points become more clear as they are easily separated and centered on individually. Kennedy uses this same system of repetition in paragraphs fifteen through eighteen by beginning each paragraph with “let both sides...”. This use of anaphora once again allows Kennedy to clearly define his points and objectives for his presidency. Each repetition builds upon the last in a climax to the final paragraph which is the culmination of all the rest. The main focus of not only the repeated phrases but an emotionally charged summation of the entire speech.
Kennedy's vigorous use of rhetoric including parallelism, antithesis, and variance in sentence structure all contribute to the success of his speech. His rhetoric in combination with his eloquence work together to clearly display his ideas in a concise yet stately manner appropriate for an inauguration. Kennedy's success is easily recognized as his speech is still read and interpreted to this day, passing the test of time.





John F. Kennedy uses appeals to pathos, ethos, and logos in his inaugural address to the American people. He also makes a very specific choice in regards to diction and syntax. He used words to appeal to the American peoples' emotions. Those words included freedom, liberty, poverty, etc. Those words are either what America is all about or what America is trying to fight for/against. He also appeals to pathos in the tone of voice that he expresses his words in. His tone, from watching the video, seems to be awe-inspiring and encouraging. Overall his purpose seems to be to fire up American citizens to fight for and support the great nation of America.
Kennedy appeals to ethos by giving his speech right after election. The office that he held is greatly respected and the ethos is present because of his office of president. The logos that he uses is present via the mentionings of historical events. The common knowledge is that history repeats itself so Kennedy did well in mentioning history in his speech. The syntax of the speech various greatly from place to place. Kennedy seems to use short, uncomplex sentences when he wants to get a short burst of thought across, but he uses the long and drawn out ones when he wishes to impress upon the American people a thought of great significance.

Posted by: Shakey



JFK Inaugural Address Analysis
By
Eleanor Rigby
Understanding the art of persuasion is crucial to establish credibility in any situation, particularly in politics. Politicians, particularly American politicians, need the people to see things their way in order to gain the authority and respect that they desire. Though there is no room for mistakes in any part of a political campaign, the inaugural address typically has the largest audience of any presidential speech and it is pertinent that any newly elected president start off their term on the right foot. Former President John F. Kennedy was well aware of this. With the appropriate use of rhetorical devises Kennedy appeals to his audience’s emotions, establishes his credibility and rationally presents his ideas in a light that appeals to the American citizens.

To appeal to emotions Kennedy touches on the many issues that America was dealing with was appropriate and comforting to the American citizens. He composes his speech with parallelism so that he does not get too caught up with any particular issue, and does not bore his audience by simply reminding them of issues face. Parallelism creates rhythm so that his speech flows and attains the audience’s attention. The parallelism at the beginning of his paragraphs also gives his speech balance so that no topic, idea, or issue becomes more important than the previous or next. Also use of antimotabole is catchy and thought provoking; “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country” (87) this also shows that he is optimistic about taking office in a difficult time for America.
Kennedy was the first Roman Catholic president, and was very young, having these traits that were not common of U.S. presidents, and that some citizens were uneasy about, it was important that Kennedy’s tone and diction adequately demonstrated his potential as president. He successfully does this by presenting himself with formal diction and serious tone.
When discussing his plans for his term, he rationalizes his ideas by putting them in a patriotic light.
The composition of rhetorical devices in Kennedy’s Inaugural address successfully presents his ideas effectively.

Posted by NickiLewinsky

>In America one of the most known traditions is the presidents’ Inaugural Address to the country. This speech lets Americans know what type of president he will be and how he plans to change the country. Since the audience is Ms. McAlhany, who knows what an inagural address is, this probably doesn't need to be explained. Each speech has its own style and one of the most memorable ones is John F. Kennedy’s. Throughout Kennedy’s Inaugural Address the use of rhetorical devices gives the speech depth and meaning.
>When a speech is given the main goal is to get personal with the audience and affect each member in its own way. Kennedy does this through his style of writing with rhetorical devices. The most commonly used one in his speech is anaphora, the repetition of the same group of words at the beginning of successive clauses. Since the audience is Ms. McAlhany, who knows what an anaphora is, this probably doesn't need to be explained. An example is “Let us be”(p12-15) Kennedy uses this technique to stress his position on to the audience by repeating himself, this will allow the audience to remember his view and understand the meaning of the statement rather than hearing it once and quickly concentrating on the next. Another way Kennedy touches Americans is by having the use of parenthesis in his address. This allows him to expand on his thoughts with added information and gets directly to the point. By doing so he shows the country that he will be confident with his positions and that he is not afraid to say the plan of action and how he plans to pursue it. The delivery of Kennedy’s “call to action” is unlike others addresses by the use of his structure. Rather than having his speech consist of a few drawn out paragraphs he uses many short paragraphs, this way he
I think you should take out "this way he" with "which" keeps the attention of the audience and makes his stances direct and powerful.
>By
Take the "by" out the use of rhetorical devices in John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address add "gives" the speech has meaning and depth. He uses the devices to make his arguments affect the audience on a personal level so that they have confidence in their new leader and know his passion behind his stances.
You might want to add another a quote or two.
Edited by -Scribbler


Posted by Mr.-T
The Inaugural Address made by the president is a landmark speech given to the American populace in order to inspire confidence and to provoke the American population to action. John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural address made extensive use of rhetorical devices in order to fulfill the goals of his speech. John F Kennedy uses antithesis, parallelism, and varying sentence structure in order to capture the audience’s attention and to show what his presidency will accomplish.
Kennedy details “a new generation of Americans” by contrasting the old and the new with antithesis. He states that his election “symbolizes an end as well as a beginning” and “signifies renewal as well as change”. This use of antithesis bridges the gap between the younger generation of Americans and the older generation. He unites them under one goal and one purpose by using antithesis, despite their differences, and prepares them for moving forward and accomplishing his goals.
Kennedy’s use of parallelism help keep the audience’s attention and help illustrate his points. He describes the “power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life” that humanity now holds, and proceeds to describe how he plans to use that power to help the free peoples of the world. This illustration adds some excitement to the speech, while including a foundation from which he will build other ideas later in the speech. Kennedy use parallelism by repeating “let us…” in the fourteenth to the eighteenth paragraph. This parallelism connects the statements forming a sort of climactic stair that his speech climbs, growing in implication and growing in excitement with each step. This keeps the reader interestingly engaged in the speech, and it ties together Kennedy’s ideas, helping the audience to understand.
Kennedy uses variable sentence structure to keep his speech dynamic and engaging. His sentence size ranges from less than ten words to over 80 words. He uses short, thoughtful, and open-ended sentences such as “this much we pledge- and more” in order to transition and prepare the reader to hear a new idea, while not drowning them in long drawn out sentences. Kennedy uses long sentences to cover larger amounts of rhetorical ground, stating examples and plucking at the heart-strings of the audience, and then he follows up the sentence with a simple fact or statement directly stating the principle he illustrated. This keeps the reader informed and it prevents the speech from becoming redundant in structure.
John F Kennedy captivates his audience and prepares the audience for the goals of his presidency by using antithesis, parallelism, and variable sentence structure. Kennedy efficiently satisfies these goals, so much so that his rhetoric is still read and analyzed today.
Your essay has really good examples of antithesis, parallelism and varying sentence structure. If you wanted, you could expand on antithesis by adding another example or add some examples of other structures that Kennedy's uses to make your essay more detailed.
edited by:cali_03


Post by: RonBurgundy



Upon being elected president of The United States of America, former late President John F. Kennedy delivered a flawless inaugural speech that will live forever in American history. Kennedy’s name is one synonymous with integrity, greatness, and America today, but at the time of the speech Kennedy had yet to serve his country and was just beginning to prove himself to the U.S. Through the use of chosen diction, ethos, pathos, and various other rhetorical devices, Kennedy establishes himself as real prospect for America and assures the American public that though it was a close race, the best choice for president was made.
Kennedy expertly meshes a formal tone that suits the occasion of inauguration with word choice that speaks to all of America. He pairs complex sentences with fairly simple paragraphs throughout, creating an air of sophistication that still holds the attention of even less educated Americans. Kennedy also constantly uses allusion to his audience, the American public, which keeps U.S. citizens attentive, but also assures them that Kennedy will lead their country for and with them. Kennedy also alludes to a sense of duty to country that calls each listener together behind him to take responsibility for the state of the U.S. and world surrounding. He constantly appeals to pathos through the unity that America strives for. Kennedy is very effective in making the United States one functioning people through only a speech.
Kennedy focuses most heavily on the use of the rhetorical triangle, namely appeals to ethos and pathos, which is purposeful in choice because both have heavy emotional context. As the president of The United States, a leader becomes the father of a nation with a very deep connection to their public that is matched by the public’s affection for them. Because presidency is such an emotional journey, Kennedy immediately addresses that aspect and uses it to his favor. Even more
interesting is the age of this speech, and that it is still applicable today. Kennedy’s genuine honesty and ability to expound just enough of his points make his speech universal, even now.
Kennedy’s inaugural speech exemplifies both effective delivery and The United States of America. He relies heavily on rhetorical devices throughout, speaking surely, effectively, and genuinely as he begins his walk with America in trying times.
Stay Classy, San Diego!

President Kennedy greeted the entire country on January 20, 1961, by facing the challenges and trying to lift morale of his fellow Americans. While giving his Inaugural address, he used many rhetorical effects to enhance his speech and to keep the readers, and or viewers attention. Kennedy described what his plans were for America and had high ambition for unification between fellow Americans and other countries. The overwhelming threat of Communism made Kennedy stress the importance of being a united country and optimistic. He conveyed all of his hopes and ambitions to everyone who was listening that day and to the people who read his speech even now.His sentence structure, along with his diction, was the most effective part of his speech. Some sentences were only a few words long, but were more powerful to some than the longer sentences. For each point that Kennedy touched on, he made the point quick and simple. He used parallelism in his sentences to tie them all together, in a sense, to be unified. He used the most rhetorical effects on the subjects he felt more towards, such as communication, camaraderie, and cooperation. By using parallel sentence structure, Kennedy had a flowing speech that never reached a boring time. He also uses some outdated words such as Revolutionary belief and forebears, that could relate well to the people during his presidency, but not as much today. The abundant use of imagery helps the reader clearly see what Kennedy invisions for our country. "Let both sides seek to invoke the wonders of science instead of its terrors. Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts,eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths, and encourage the arts of commerce," is just one of the examples. One of his examples did not make much sense to me and it must not have made sense to the people listening either. "Those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside," didn't make much sense. The way i interpreted it is that the people who rode on others shirt tail's or used others to obtain power, got buried in the mess that they created. By Kennedy's use of comparison and contrast, his main views were highlighted and passed throughout his speech and into everyday life. Kennedy believed in being united under one belief, to provide support for each other and support to those surrounding us. He was ready to help America through the difficult times that may lie ahead that he faced with hope and optimism. During his speech, he appealed to pathos by stating,"Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." He also used pathos in speaking about those that have died for freedom and the luxuries we have today. He appeals to ethos because he was the President of the U.S. Kennedy's appeal to logos was stated in the fact of unification. It seems logical for a country as big as ours to be combined as one, in one belief. Former President Kennedy made a very effective speech by using all of these rhetorical effects
Posted by Loveofquotes

n America one of the most known traditions is the presidents’ Inaugural Address to the country. This speech lets Americans know what type of president he will be and how he plans to change the country. Each speech has its own style and one of the most memorable ones is John F. Kennedy’s. Throughout Kennedy’s Inaugural Address the use of rhetorical devices gives the speech depth and meaning.
>When a speech is given the main goal is to get personal with the audience and affect each member in its own way. Kennedy does this through his style of writing with rhetorical devices. The most commonly used one in his speech is anaphora, the repetition of the same group of words at the beginning of successive clauses. An example is “Let us be”(p12-15) Kennedy uses this technique to stress his position on to the audience by repeating himself, this will allow the audience to remember his view and understand the meaning of the statement rather than hearing it once and quickly concentrating on the next. Another way Kennedy touches Americans is by having the use of parenthesis in his address. This allows him to expand on his thoughts with added information and gets directly to the point. By doing so he shows the country that he will be confident with his positions and that he is not afraid to say the plan of action and how he plans to pursue it. The delivery of Kennedy’s “call to action” is unlike others addresses by the use of his structure. Rather than having his speech consist of a few drawn out paragraphs he uses many short paragraphs, this way he keeps the attention of the audience and makes his stances direct and powerful.
>By the use of rhetorical devices in John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address the speech has meaning and depth. He uses the devices to make his arguments affect the audience on a personal level so that they have confidence in their new leader and know his passion behind his stances.

posted by: NickiLewinsky


John F. Kennedy in January of 1961 gave a wonderful yet interesting speech. Using plenty of rhetorical devices, along with certain themes in the end, he creates a broad visual for the country and its people.
>The Inaugural address, as it starts, Kennedy uses strong diction when he speaks about the world. In paragraph three, "For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish al forms of human proerty..." the words are chosen that would best grab the listeners. The way things are ran, or will run, Kennedy says that its left up to the people, yet God has the helping hand.
>The speech varies in each word he spoke.Using arrangment of words, speaks of talking about the main subject yet expanding what should be said.When Kennedy uses syntax, he used short sayings and lengthing vocabulary. In paragraph six, "any" is used repeatly which takes the audience listening to another level because anaphore of the sentence catches what he is trying to speak of.
>Metaphors, cliches, rhetorcal questions along with feelings in the speech, tells the people that Kennedy was not just making this up without any care.He repeats yet changes the words,"To those","To those old allies","To Our sister republics","To what world".Each one of those sentence starters expresses a sense of his meaning. "Riding the back of the tiger ended up inside" shows a cliches we rarly would hear in todays time. "Master of its own house". The metaphor of those run their own life.
>The purpose of the speech,was not only to express what the country will or has gone threw, but also to show how he feels towards what he does. The usage of rhetorical devices can change the way a mind thinks.


wrote by doodle :))

waverly
The Speech made by former president JFK, has lasted throughout the years as a piece of history and a form of language that can be learned from. Throughout his speech former president John F. Kennedy uses many different rhetorical devises. His form of writing made his audience feel as if they were apart of something big, a family perhaps. I say family because he says repeatedly through the speech “we”. His purpose for using we was to become a person in the crowd not just the new president, he wanted to have everyone equal and show that he was in it with them, he was for the people. This of course shows that his speech appeals to pathos. The way his speech appeals to all of his listeners emotions is almost fatherly. He says that he wants to help the United States better itself but it can’t do that without the help of its people. He reinstates that when he says, “ask not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country”. Kennedy also uses a unique structure in his writing of the speech. He uses short paragraphs and sentences to make his point clear, along with the repitition of phrases which were, “To those”, and “Let both sides”. These uses of anaphora’s purposely catch the attention of the listeners and readers of this speech and are used for them to better understand what Kennedy is trying to convey.Also throughout his speech Kennedy uses a series of rhetoric questions, examples of those are, “My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.” and has stated previously ,“And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” These rhetorical questions are used to make his audience think and give them new ideas they may not have thought of before.The John F. Kennedy Speech as gone through history as a beacon of hope for Americans and a signal for change, as well as a piece of English composition that obviously is used in classes today.